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Holi Mahotsav Sydney 2012 Celebrations




Darling Habour on a Sunday afternoon is usually filled with families, tourists and couples enjoying the parks, rides and the views. Today, however, there was an added vibrance to this picture of Darling Harbour. 

The festival of Holi, fell on 8th of March this year (Phalgun Poornima according to the Hindu calendar) and was widely celebrated in Indian and all over the globe. Sydney, however came together today, i.e. Sunday of 25th of March 2012 to celebrate this festival of colours, hope and fun.
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Holi in a nut-shell:
Holi is a religious (Hindu) spring festival that is celebrated by all religious faiths, right after winters and is one of the major festivals of India. It is called the Spring Festival - as it marks the arrival of spring the season of hope and joy and is the most vibrant of all. The main day, Holi is celebrated by people throwing coloured powder and coloured water at each other. People walk down their neighbourhoods to exchange colours and spraying coloured water on one another. 

It is believed that, the change in the weather causes viral fever and cold and the playful throwing of natural coloured powders has a medicinal significance. The colours are traditionally made of Neem, Kumkum, Haldi, Bilva, and other medicinal herbs prescribed by Ayurvedic doctors. For wet colours, traditional flowers of Palash are boiled and soaked in water over night to produced yellow coloured water, which also had medicinal properties. 

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Ok, back to today's festivities. It was a gorgeous Autumn day in Sydney. Sun was shining bright with occasional cloud cover. When we got there, things were already in motion. With lots of dances, lots of colours flowing around and lots of tasty food to indulge in, it was a great experience. 
Below are images of some of moments captured today. 
KedR




























































kedR.com.au - View my 'Indian Wedding Photography Sydney' set

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